Human skull found in a fort ditch at Vindolanda, belonging to a young rebel from South-West Scotland, whose severed head was displayed on a pole near the fort, in the Vindolanda Museum, Hadrian's Wall, Northumberland, England. Hadrian's Wall was built 73 miles across Britannia, now England, 122-128 AD, under the reign of Emperor Hadrian, ruled 117-138, to mark the Northern extent of the Roman Empire and guard against barbarian attacks from the Picts to the North. The Vindolanda Museum is run by the Vindolanda Charitable Trust and forms part of the Hadrian's Wall UNESCO World Heritage Site. Picture by Manuel Cohen

LC16_ENGLAND_MC_015.jpg

1 of 1

Human skull found in a fort ditch at Vindolanda, belonging to a young rebel from South-West Scotland, whose severed head was displayed on a pole near the fort, in the Vindolanda Museum, Hadrian's Wall, Northumberland, England. Hadrian's Wall was built 73 miles across Britannia, now England, 122-128 AD, under the reign of Emperor Hadrian, ruled 117-138, to mark the Northern extent of the Roman Empire and guard against barbarian attacks from the Picts to the North. The Vindolanda Museum is run...
more »


Copyright © Manuel Cohen

3.3MB
6585x4522
Keywords:
archaeological
archaeology
archeological
archeology
bone
border
boundary
Britain
Britannia
British
collection
color
colour
death
decapitated
England
English
excavated
excavation
fort
frontier
Frontiers of the Roman Empire
Great Britain
Hadrian
Hadrian's Wall
heritage
history
horizontal
human
image
indoors
inside
interior
killed
limit
murdered
museum
National Park
Northumberland
Northumberland National Park
Picts Wall
rebel
Roman
Roman Britain
Roman Empire
Roman Wall
severed head
site
skull
tourism
tourist attraction
traitor
travel
UK
UNESCO
UNESCO World Heritage Site
United Kingdom
Vallum Aelium
Vallum Hadriani
Vindolanda
Vindolanda Charitable Trust
Vindolanda Fort
Vindolanda Museum
wall